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Tonedeff We’re just gonna leave these here…

I don’t know if I want to be mad or make fun of them. Both???

houstonz said:I don’t know if I want to be mad or make fun of them. Both???

My thoughts exactly.. people just don’t seem to get Tone the way they should. I’m tempted to call them simple minded but at the risk of sounding like a dick I’ll hold back.

that is pretty ridiculous… to each their town, but apparently both writers lack logic in writing reviews… contradictory statements and unrelated info to Polymer.

At least the Rap Reviews one gave it a 7.5 out of 10. I don’t agree with everything he says, but 7.5 is a very good score imo.

The thought of skipping tracks like phantom just because it doesn’t have any rapping on it is incredibly frustrating to me. The singing is phenomenal on this record.

The thing with Tonedeff is his rapping skill is easily a 10 and his singing is a strong 7. People expect based off his features to get an album of high-octane rapping and he throws the most ferocious curve balls for the casual listener with all the singing.

I personally like the singing for the most part, but it takes significantly more effort to digest the singing than the rapping (at least to me).

Disgruntled Negro said:The thing with Tonedeff is his rapping skill is easily a 10 and his singing is a strong 7. People expect based off his features to get an album of high-octane rapping and he throws the most ferocious curve balls for the casual listener with all the singing.

I personally like the singing for the most part, but it takes significantly more effort to digest the singing than the rapping (at least to me).

fair enough, but if singing is such an issue, explain drake & kanye. theyre a strong 3.2

They were both generally positive reviews considering. Obviously lazy on the actual album reviewing - that second one spent half the review talking about his background (really old irrelvant information) and barely anything on the album itself - except Tone’s an ‘average’ singer? Ok.

Each to their own. Hip-hop purists are gonna be confused by this album, but it wasn’t made for them. I’m way more interested in the electronic/alternative/songwriter opinions of how someone can take those ideas and add rap rather than the other way around.

Also - I do think that the delivery of some of the more personal songs in this album have high barriers to entry with their speed and amount of layers. You can’t really pick out word for word without intense concentration or following the lyrics which is gonna mean a lot of the casual listeners are going to miss it’s sustinence. Personally I’m all for it because Tonedeff music to me is something to be studied like a textbook - but songs like ‘politics’ amd ‘porcelain’ are likely gonna resonate with people easier imo.

WaleKilla said:fair enough, but if singing is such an issue, explain drake & kanye. theyre a strong 3.2

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Disgruntled Negro said:The thing with Tonedeff is his rapping skill is easily a 10 and his singing is a strong 7.

Well sure, I would’ve considered this to be true back in the Archetype era. Tone used to be a technically accurate singer, with an average voice…but with really absolutely incredible musical ideas.

Dude took things to another level on this record though. His voice has gained a natural confidence and clarity, to the point where he’s now doing the things “normal singers” do—little inflections here and there on certain notes—effortlessly. It never crossed my mind once on this album that he was “a rapper singing.” As far as I’m concerned, after tracks like “The Things You Don’t See Coming” and “Phantom”...Dude’s earned the title of singer-songwriter.

Now, if that isn’t a particular listener’s cup of tea…that’s fair enough. But I would challenge anyone who says it’s because “his singing isn’t good enough” to show me what singer-songwriters they’re using as their basis of comparison.

It’s true that expectations are a bitch though. If you go into this record looking for an hour of Peruvian Cocaine you’re going to be disappointed, point blank. Like Epic mentions - I’m far more interested in seeing what reviewers who aren’t solely interested in rap—who have never heard of Tonedeff before—have to say.

THey gave the SChoolboy Q a 3/5 too… and that’s supp to be good, right? it’s written horribly, but in an age where it’s about how fast and how much you can put out…not really anything new.

At least the RR guy put links to the YouTube tracks.

worm9103 said:it’s written horribly, but in an age where it’s about how fast and how much you can put out…not really anything new.

that swurve guy cant write for shit IMO

His light speed vocals and blankety crooning tend to blur his verbally given lessons, and he’s got plenty of good ones so let’s recap.

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It’s sonically hard, intense, hectic and irked, giving an acidy rock type vibe for the most part. A handful of Polymer‘s tracks are not even rap songs.

acidy rock?

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Epic Aesthetic said:I’m way more interested in the electronic/alternative/songwriter opinions of how someone can take those ideas and add rap rather than the other way around.

This!... My brother-in-law falls in that group. He listens to little to no hip hop. I’m excited for him to listen to it so I can pick his brain.

Hip-hop fans have too much baggage. You’re either a mainstream fan in which case you’re an idiot (barring the occasional exception like Kendrick), or a backpacker who prunes for the past and is afraid of change.

In either case, like Simon Pegg in Hot Fuzz: Tone’s just out there making all the other rappers look bad.

WaleKilla said:

fair enough, but if singing is such an issue, explain drake & kanye. theyre a strong 3.2

Well rapping wise they’re at about a 6-7 and 5 respectively overall; based on their most recent albums both are at about a 3.2. So if you can like their rapping makes sense you could like their singing too. This coming from someone who considers them both among his favorite music artists (but nowhere near Tone or the Lynguists, don’t worry)

Anyways, the rapreviews.com is pretty good IMO as reviews, especially online ones, go. But I have really low expectations for music reviews in general these days. I think it’s pretty obvious it’s written by someone who almost exclusively listens to hip-hop and isn’t that necessarily open minded to other stuff. For example, saying the songs are “REALLY long”? A nine minute song is on the short end for a Swans or Godspeed You! record for example. And I can get his point about the singing. I don’t think Tone is an “average” singer (I’m not entirely sure of the metric he’s using though), he’s a great one. But in terms of rapping he’s pretty much #1 and he’s not there (yet) with singing. At the same time, someone who says “Phantom” and “The Things You Don’t See Coming” are skippable has really different taste than me. Singing can do things that rapping can’t, and Tone’s emotion plus the fact the lyrics are up to par with his rapping stuff more than make up for the fact that his singing isn’t as good as his rapping. But overall this guy is aware that a lot of his are subjective and that Tone does what he does for good reason. So I’m not mad at him.

The other review is poorly written and rife with grammatical errors

Polymer only touches the excellent Archetype debut from the man instead of vying with it for which is better. The former is by a sizable margin.

I still don’t really know what that means, except I think he’s saying Archetype is a lot better (big surprise).

I feel kind of bad ripping on that dude cause it seems like he’s a random kid doing reviews for fun - can’t be too mad at that. But it seems like he just gives 3/5’s to everything? How do you say an album you wait eleven years for and delivered for the most part is a 3/5 unless you’re using some super harsh grading curve? Whatever man. Neither reviews are as bad as some of the stuff people were saying about *Glutton* - that Tone was selling out for rapping over dubstep or that “Sunshine” sounded like a Pitbull track.

The problem is that Tone is not a big name in really any circle outside of ours and A LOT people aren’t gonna give him the time and attention his album deserves. None of those reviews touched on the themes of the album, the sequencing, really broke down the layers in each song. None of them noted stuff like how it makes sense for the production to be heavily electronic since it’s called *Polymer*. Music is digested quickly these days, and WHILE I think you could review a Drake CD off of just a few listens cause it’s not very deep (nothing wrong with that, but it’s not), something like this needs to be sat down to and listened to carefully while studying the lyrics if you’re to gain a full appreciation.

Honestly this is why I’d be hesitant to have Fantano review it. Dude has a pretty sizable cult following and I think he gets a lot of stuff wrong. I’m just gonna rage if some reviewer talks about how “Filthy” doesn’t fit because it’s too happy and dirty or that the album is too erratic moving from calm to crazed from track to track. Unfortunately, people tend to give challenging stuff the proper attention it deserves if it’s by someone that’s already well known or other people say it’s good. If *Yeezus* was released by some random guy no one would have given it critical acclaim. *To Pimp a Butterfly* might’ve gotten overlooked if it was released by some underground rapper instead of Kendrick Lamar.

If *Yeezus* was released by some random guy no one would have given it critical acclaim. *To Pimp a Butterfly* might’ve gotten overlooked if it was released by some underground rapper instead of Kendrick Lamar.

if kendrick made the demon song people would call him a genius and say hes the best rapper in the history of the world. too bad tone will never get seen for what he does imo

Epic Aesthetic said:You’re either a mainstream fan in which case you’re an idiot (barring the occasional exception like Kendrick)

You sound just as ignorant if not more.

Epic Aesthetic said:Hip-hop fans have too much baggage. You’re either a mainstream fan in which case you’re an idiot (barring the occasional exception like Kendrick), or a backpacker who prunes for the past and is afraid of change.

In either case, like Simon Pegg in Hot Fuzz: Tone’s just out there making all the other rappers look bad.

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Case closed? Case closed.

I would say that Tone only being a 7 in terms of singing is kind of low. His singing was just as good as his rapping was on this album to me.

Loewi said:

Epic Aesthetic said:You’re either a mainstream fan in which case you’re an idiot (barring the occasional exception like Kendrick)

You sound just as ignorant if not more.

you been outside lately? mouthbreathers and tryhards all day

I mean if you guys really wanna rage these are the comments for *Glutton* on rateyourmusic

Is that you, Pitbull????

Weird. It feels like some kind of bet. The question is: Has Tonedeff won or lost?

I truly expected better from Tonedeff. I’m aware of what he was attempting to say with this EP, but it doesn’t matter how well-intentioned and meaningful your message is if the music itself is bad. It just isn’t very listenable. It actually takes some of the worst elements from a lot of today’s music. Maybe Tonedeff was attempting to be subversive or whatever by doing that, but it just doesn’t work, not even in the context of the lyrical topics.

(I have to comment on this - this guy clearly thinks dubstep and house music were started in 2010 by Skrillex and David Guetta)

You can’t possibly be serious…

And the one redeeming review

Tonedeff’s forthcoming second album Polymer is being released as a series of EPs, with each one set to thematically represent a different side of his personality. The first to be released is Glutton – a dark exploration of our man’s addictive vices, sexual cravings and unquenched desires, told lyrically and through electronic, synth-based production. This is unlike anything I’ve ever heard before. Tone is actively challenging you to enjoy the music here, revealing a desperate, vulnerable, and somewhat depraved, but ultimately honest side to himself. As a fan of some years, I can appreciate Tonedeff’s always been a heart-on-sleeve kind of artist, and sexual deprivation is not uncharted territory in his music. We’ve never been this far out in the deep end though; it’s confronting. This is the ugliest Tonedeff’s catharsis has ever been, and I’m not surprised to see it his most polarising work yet. The beats conjure up images of dark nightclubs – not the user-friendly kind with girls dancing and sipping on vodka cruisers, but something danker… with chains, and ball gags, and strippers who don’t speak English. Probably the victims of human trafficking. Menacing stuff. No doubt this will be the hardest of the Polymer EPs to appreciate, which is probably why our man wanted to release it first… not unlike an exorcism. Whether you love or hate it, you have to give credit where it’s due. Tonedeff always does what he wants and doesn’t give a fuck. This a brave, warts-on-the-table collection of trips to the psychiatrist’s office from a multifaceted, innovative artist who will probably never get the props he feels he ever deserves. Playing it safe is for chumps.

tak08810 said:I mean if you guys really wanna rage these are the comments for *Glutton* on rateyourmusic

Is that you, Pitbull????

Weird. It feels like some kind of bet. The question is: Has Tonedeff won or lost?

I truly expected better from Tonedeff. I’m aware of what he was attempting to say with this EP, but it doesn’t matter how well-intentioned and meaningful your message is if the music itself is bad. It just isn’t very listenable. It actually takes some of the worst elements from a lot of today’s music. Maybe Tonedeff was attempting to be subversive or whatever by doing that, but it just doesn’t work, not even in the context of the lyrical topics.

(I have to comment on this - this guy clearly thinks dubstep and house music were started in 2010 by Skrillex and David Guetta)

You can’t possibly be serious…

And the one redeeming review

Tonedeff’s forthcoming second album Polymer is being released as a series of EPs, with each one set to thematically represent a different side of his personality. The first to be released is Glutton – a dark exploration of our man’s addictive vices, sexual cravings and unquenched desires, told lyrically and through electronic, synth-based production. This is unlike anything I’ve ever heard before. Tone is actively challenging you to enjoy the music here, revealing a desperate, vulnerable, and somewhat depraved, but ultimately honest side to himself. As a fan of some years, I can appreciate Tonedeff’s always been a heart-on-sleeve kind of artist, and sexual deprivation is not uncharted territory in his music. We’ve never been this far out in the deep end though; it’s confronting. This is the ugliest Tonedeff’s catharsis has ever been, and I’m not surprised to see it his most polarising work yet. The beats conjure up images of dark nightclubs – not the user-friendly kind with girls dancing and sipping on vodka cruisers, but something danker… with chains, and ball gags, and strippers who don’t speak English. Probably the victims of human trafficking. Menacing stuff. No doubt this will be the hardest of the Polymer EPs to appreciate, which is probably why our man wanted to release it first… not unlike an exorcism. Whether you love or hate it, you have to give credit where it’s due. Tonedeff always does what he wants and doesn’t give a fuck. This a brave, warts-on-the-table collection of trips to the psychiatrist’s office from a multifaceted, innovative artist who will probably never get the props he feels he ever deserves. Playing it safe is for chumps.

Oddly enough I’m not surprised people are saying all this stuff (I’m excluding the last guy). Tonedeff isn’t the most accessible artist out there and even if we all love it.. a casual listener 9 times out of 10 isn’t going to understand why the album sounds the way it does. I don’t like that that’s the case.. but it is what it is. The same thing happened when Archetype dropped.

The rap reviews one doesn’t really surprise me at all.. I mean this is the same site that gave a Canibus record a perfect 10. A site like that would probably keep Tonedeff in the rappity rap box along with MCs like Ras Kass, Big Pun, Chino XL, etc. So when that boxed artist steps outside of their comfort zone… they’ll feel let down by it.

This is why I thought Tonedeff gave the PERFECT answer to the person saying he’s going to listen to Archetype and Polymer based off the stuff hes heard Tone do for features.

A lot of hip hop listeners outside of this forum don’t have an open mind.

I feel like this record will resonate more with people who aren’t traditionally fans of Hip Hop music. That doesn’t mean EVERYONE else, because it takes a particular type of person to actually CARE about music. However, I’ve seen plenty of cases where people enjoy stuff like CunninLynguists or Tonedeff music because of the honesty, artistry, and deviation from typical rap shit that they’re exposed to on a daily basis. They can appreciate an artist showing vulnerability or doing a song about time and anxiety and making the entire thing sound like fucking panic. Like Timo and Pat said above, I’m moreso looking forward to reviews from non-rap based outlets.. Hopefully it can get some shine in those types of places.

WaleKilla said:

Disgruntled Negro said:The thing with Tonedeff is his rapping skill is easily a 10 and his singing is a strong 7. People expect based off his features to get an album of high-octane rapping and he throws the most ferocious curve balls for the casual listener with all the singing.

I personally like the singing for the most part, but it takes significantly more effort to digest the singing than the rapping (at least to me).

fair enough, but if singing is such an issue, explain drake & kanye. theyre a strong 3.2

For what it’s worth - I prefer Drake, Kanye, etc. to rap than sing.

Disgruntled Negro said:

WaleKilla said:

Disgruntled Negro said:The thing with Tonedeff is his rapping skill is easily a 10 and his singing is a strong 7. People expect based off his features to get an album of high-octane rapping and he throws the most ferocious curve balls for the casual listener with all the singing.

I personally like the singing for the most part, but it takes significantly more effort to digest the singing than the rapping (at least to me).

fair enough, but if singing is such an issue, explain drake & kanye. theyre a strong 3.2

For what it’s worth - I prefer Drake, Kanye, etc. to rap than sing.

same here. thats my my point. theyre both horrific singers but sell millions. but somehow tonedeff is expected to sign like d’angelo. shits weird IMO

This is an ironic thread in many ways. One of the message’s in Polymer is very applicable to our relationship with the other music spheres of fandom. As Blue Schoolers, we can’t worry about what other people think. Gotta let go of ‘controlling’ other people’s opinions and let go of the competitive nature of wanting people to like what we like. Just enjoy our tastes and that’s it.

Great thread to compile reviews, and surely let’s call out any lazy writing that doesn’t go in-depth - but musical taste is subjective. There’s a reason why this community is what it is. We are willing to appreciate a work of music past the surface level. Some people can’t or rather don’t want to. Lives are busy, everyone has something in life that they’re interested in or passionate about. For us, music is one of them.

There’s honestly no review that can shock me after following QN5 artists for over 13 years lol. I think what’s important is not worrying or judging other people’s reviews or opinions - but rather offer them a hand in understanding it better. I’ve been able to turn so many people onto Tonedeff, but in person, because I was able to bring them into this world of thought. Once they ‘got it’ - an appreciation was built and something clicked. I have had an impact on some of my friends to the point that they can’t even listen to the music they used to. But this is so much easier in person. Best thing you can do is honestly share this album with friends and have them sit down through the whole thing with you. Find some awesome monitors, invite them for a drink, coffee, tea, or popcorn - get a comfy sitting arrangement. At least at the end of the day, you know they gave Polymer a fair chance, and I’m sure more times than not - with a blue schooler guiding them - they’ll get it.

Then a snowball effect. I know this works because I personally saw it happen in high school when A Piece of Strange came out. Remember the sparknotes we ended up making for it?

mattthegod said:I would say that Tone only being a 7 in terms of singing is kind of low. His singing was just as good as his rapping was on this album to me.

Tone is a good singer but he is a master of the skill of rapping. In terms of rapping, he does things I have NEVER HEARD BEFORE he did it. I’m not talking about speed, it’s every aspect of rapping. That’s probably, in my estimation, why he’s moving ahead more with the PAR stuff because what else does he have to prove rapping?

I rocks with the singing. It adds a dimension to his records that make them epic. I think he goes a little TOO grandiose with his arrangements (a call back to the notion that his songs are too long), but I can appreciate them. The casual listener can’t.

I still wish “Centerfold” was on the LP. That probably had the biggest commercial appeal of all of these records. I know that’s not Tone’s goal (at all), but I could see that song being licensed a million times over.

Loewi said:

Epic Aesthetic said:You’re either a mainstream fan in which case you’re an idiot (barring the occasional exception like Kendrick)

You sound just as ignorant if not more.

Feel free to read between the lines at any point, but a lot (not all) of mainstream rap music is written, publicised and sold to satisfy the lowest common denominator.. the idiots.. because they make up the largest share of the market.

I’m not saying that ‘simple’ music is somehow bad.. because if people feel good about it then who am I to judge? But if someone thinks ‘Panda’ is HOTT BAARRRRZZ then they’re simply not a person I wish to have a conversation with.

Epic Aesthetic said:

Loewi said:

Epic Aesthetic said:You’re either a mainstream fan in which case you’re an idiot (barring the occasional exception like Kendrick)

You sound just as ignorant if not more.

Feel free to read between the lines at any point, but a lot (not all) of mainstream rap music is written, publicised and sold to the lowest common denominator.. the idiots.. because they make up the largest share of the market.

I’m not saying that ‘simple’ music is somehow bad.. because if people feel good about it then who am I to judge? But if someone thinks ‘Panda’ is HOTT BAARRRRZZ then they’re simply not a person I wish to have a conversation with.

^^^^^ This.

I don’t have a problem with most of the reviews because they are generally opinions of people who are looking for rap music, and the RapReviews article especially emphasizes that the singing isn’t preferable to his taste which is fine. There are plenty of classic albums that I respect but do not enjoy. Even further, we were able to digest this album in parts over three years, so our understanding of the finished project is wildly different from someone who listened to it a few times to get a review out. Like was said earlier, Tone’s music, ESPECIALLY Polymer, is more of a textbook than a rap album. It takes multiple lessons and readings to properly assess.

Saying that, I think the SWURV article was especially lazy and clearly didn’t understand the album. Like for Five Sisters he says “the story of five sisters taking after their flawed mothers and releasing their attitudes into the world” which suggests to me that he didn’t get that they are HIS sisters and it’s about how they’ve shaped HIM. Also the poor grammar is annoying.

But overall, seeing people who say “I don’t like singing” give it relatively high reviews isn’t something to get mad about, it shows that even those who don’t quite get it are able to appreciate how big this is. Hopefully it continues to connect more and better with others.

The RapReviews dude had to put in a “tone deaf” pun not once, but twice. As if one time isn’t cringeworthy enough. ffs